Lu Over the Wall (Cinema Review)

Lu Over the Wall

MUSIC, MERMAIDS AND MELANCHOLIA

Thanks to my new working relationship with the guys and gal over at podcast/website 60 Minutes With, I was hugely excited to accept an invitation to the Screening Rooms in London’s Soho at the tail-end of October to see an exclusive critics-only preview screening of this fantastical musical Japanese Anime feature. With its limited UK cinema release beginning yesterday, the embargo has been lifted and I can now post a link to my review of Masaaki Yuasa’s Lu Over the Wall.

Click HERE for a direct link to my musings.

HERE is the film’s official English-language website, with listings of all UK cinemas who are screening it.

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When Marnie Was There (DVD Review)

Image result for when marnie was there film

U – 103mins – 2014


 

FINE ON THE OUTSIDE

Transposing the setting of Joan G. Robinson’s 1967 children’s book from North Norfolk to Sapporo, Japan, Arrietty director Hiromasa Yonebayashi’s second feature film is otherwise respectfully dutiful to its classic source material – a book which Studio Ghibli founder Hayau Miyazaki proclaimed one of his top fifty children’s stories of all time.

… Keep Scuttling!

Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders (Cinema Review)

The Land Before Time IV: Journey Through the Mists (DVD Review)

U – 71mins – 1996


 

STRONGER TOGETHER

“Everywhere things are changing,” so warns the opening narration as we are re-introduced to our weather-wracked prehistoric planet where profuse precipitation is introducing new amphibious species into the dino-dominated eco-system. The earth now too soggy to be lived on, anxious herds are forced to migrate to the as-yet-untouched paradise of the Great Valley.

Yep, that’s right – with none of the calamitous climate-controlled changes yet to affect Littlefoot (Scott McAfee) and co., it is morally-virtuous business as usual for our reliable band of affectionate amigos in this fourth template-aligning Land Before Time adventure, which once more celebrates growth, embraces change and promotes teamwork through a mixture of colourful characters, fun adventures and sing-a-long songs.

Everyone has a part to play and a time to shine – even a not-so-silent Spike (“You talk-ted, yep, yep yep!”) and a furry micro-scamp christened Tickles – when Grandpa Longneck (Kenneth Mars) falls ill. It is up to our brave band of plucky plant-polishing protagonists to set off into the dangerous unknown to find and bring back the golden petal of the medicinal nightflower to save Littefoot’s beloved guardian.

Stubborn Cera (remaining original voice artist Candace Hutson in her final franchise appearance) is forced to overcome her jealousy when a new longneck playmate, Ali (Juliana Hansen), grabs Littefoot’s attention, while our innocent explorers must escape a bickering pair of dependant-yet-uncooperative famished foes in a treacherous overlong cavern setpiece which expands the backdrop but dissipates the pace from this short-but-sweet adventure where even the carnivorous critters are cute in the sunshine.

CR@B Verdict: 2 stars

The Land Before Time II: The Great Valley Adventure (DVD Review)

 U – 72mins – 1994


 

ESCHEWING THE MYSTERIOUS BEYOND

“If this was a game I’d never want to play again.”

In the aftermath of the Jurassic Park dino-boom, and six years after the little foot with the big heart stomped to a brontosaurus-sized box office bow, the loveable long neck and his assorted leaf-licking playmates herded back to the screen for a second profound and plucky prehistoric romp.

The Land Before Time director Don Bluth, executive producers Steven Spielberg and George Lucas and composer James Horner all stayed away from this cinema-skipping Great Valley Adventure (as did all but one of the voice cast), but some nauseatingly twee musical numbers attempt to inject some buoyancy into the competent-but-noticeably-flatter animation.

And yet, once you have lowered your expectations and conceded this is a cheaper affair in a lower league than the iconic original (the kidified modification of the Universal logo keys you in to this mind-set from the off), there are still the fossils of an endearing story to be unearthed beneath the superficial chaff.

Apatosaurus Littlefoot (Scott McAfee) and his friends all retain their distinctive and charming personalities as they learn that as hard as it is to be little, “acting grown up is hard. It is, it is.” Chasing down two egg-napping raptor-like foes (one of whom sounds a lot like Tim Curry), the brave band decide to hand-rear the rescued hatchling themselves – until it transpires to be a sharptooth whose parents are desperate to track it down!

There are astute allusions to peer pressure, and carry-overs from The Land Before Time of prejudice against other species (“a sharptooth can never be one of us!”), while the sundry life lessons converge in a climatic solution which overcomes the gang’s adversities and saves the day – hooray for teamwork!

In a film which bestows the virtues of enjoying your youth and not growing up too soon it seems somewhat miserly and incongruous for me to be too hard on this colourful and virtuous little scamp, which will undoubtedly delight the undemanding diddy-demographic it is aimed at.

CR@B Verdict: 2 stars