Enemy (DVD Review)

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15 – 86mins – 2013


 

MULTIPLICITY

Jake Gyllenhaal plays an average Joe college professor who catches a glimpse of a very familiar face in the background of a DVD he has rented, kickstarting an increasingly obsessive quest to track down his fame-seeking doppelganger (also Gyllenhaal). Well, I was sold by the synopsis! I didn’t even have to know that Oscar winner Denis Arrival Villeneuve was behind the lens – I needed to see this film and I was shocked that it had evaded my attention for five years.

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The Party (DVD Review)

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15 – 68mins – 2017


 

REVELATORY REVELLERS

At a dinner party for a few close friends to commemorate Janet’s (Kristin Scott Thomas) political victory and ministerial appointment, her husband Bill (Timothy Finding Your Feet Spall) derails the celebrations with a pair of explosive revelations which have catastrophic ramifications for the majority of those present. Will everyone make it out of The Party alive…?

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The Strangers (DVD Review)

15 – 85mins – 2008


 

DOLL-FACED KILLERS

With the belated and long-teased sequel Prey At Night just opening Stateside (it was originally announced for a 2009 release date before entering development hell for the best part of a decade), I thought it was high-time I got my act together and finally watched the first Strangers film. Now TEN years old, the DVD has been lingering on my to-watch pile for far too long.

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Dracula Untold (DVD Review)

15 – 92mins – 2014


 

SON OF THE DRAGON

In my post-cinema analysis of last summer’s Tom Cruise-headlined reboot of The Mummy (read my review HERE), I openly acknowledged my enjoyment of the film in spite of its skew away from horror and more towards a supernatural action-adventure. However, it seems audiences (or a lack thereof) were more critical; just one entry in and Universal’s newly-rebranded Dark Universe is already in trouble. But The Mummy wasn’t always to be the opening chapter of this Monster Movie Expanded Universe…

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2017 in Review: TOP 5 SURPRISE FILMS

TOP 5 SURPRISE FILMS

I don’t tend to write too many blogposts which aren’t reviews of individuals titles or releases, but as we wave goodbye to 2017 I have been looking back over my movie diary for the year (yes, I keep a movie diary – don’t mock me!) and have been inspired to do a string of ‘year in review’ posts. My Top 10 Films of 2017 will be published on the 60 Minutes With website in the coming days, but I have a few companion ‘sister blogs’ to compliment this main piece, which I will publish here on The CR@Bpendium.

First up, as the title of this post reveals, is a rundown of my TOP 5 SURPRISE FILMS of 2017 – the films which may not have necessarily been the most awe-inspiring or flawless masterpieces, but they bowled me over nonetheless. This could have been because I had little to no prior knowledge of them, or I expected a flop and was pleased to be proved wrong. Prepare to be surprised!

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A Christmas Carol (DVD Review)

Image result for a christmas carol 1999

PG – 95mins – 1999


 

MAKE IT S(N)O(W)

Perhaps the most famous Christmas story ever written, authored by perhaps the most famous novelist who ever lived, Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol has had more adaptations and reimaginings than you can shake a sprig of holly at. While some will always cherish the olde worlde charm of the Alastair Sim classic (1951), Albert Finney’s beloved musical (1970), the Muppets’ frantic, family-friendly retelling (1992), Bill Murray’s modernised comedy, Scrooged (1988), or Disney’s Jim Carrey-heavy performance capture animation (2009), for me this 1999 TV movie starring the man who is Jean Luc Picard is the quintessential version. My dad and I habitually return to it in the lead up to every Christmas and I must have seen it in excess of fifteen times.

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A Quiet Passion (DVD Review)

12 – 120mins – 2017


 

THE LITERATURE OF MISERY

“Sometimes, Emily, you are as ugly as your poetry!”

Written and directed by Sunset Song‘s Terence Davies, A Quiet Passion is both a boldly compelling yet persistently frustrating portrait of a literary great: prolific 19th century American poet Emily Dickinson, whose unusual existence is chartered from youth to death by two actors: Emma Bell for the opening twenty minutes takes on Emily’s post-school days, morphing into Cynthia Nixon for the concluding hour and forty minutes

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