STAR TREK: DISCOVERY, 1.4 – “The Butcher’s Knife Cares Not for the Lamb’s Cry” (Netflix Review)

Streaming on UK Netflix from: Monday 8th October 2017

Series created by: Bryan Fuller and Alex Kurtzman

Written by: Jesse Alexander and Aron Eli Coleite

Directed by: Olatunde Osunsanmi


 

UNIQUELY INTERESTING

“Let’s send our Klingon friends a message they won’t forget.”

Settling into its new post-‘second pilot’ direction, episode 1.4 of Star Trek: Discovery gave me the distinct impression that it was panicked about how grand, impressive and memorable it was, and frequently felt the need to throw everything at the audience in a shallow attempt to impress. While it’s by no means a complete shipwreck, “The Butcher’s Knife…” is both the busiest and my least favourite of the new series thus far.

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STAR TREK: DISCOVERY, 1.3 – “Context is for Kings” (Netflix Review)

Streaming on UK Netflix from: Monday 2nd October 2017

Story by: Bryan Fuller, Gretchen J. Berg and Aaron Harberts

Teleplay by: Gretchen J. Berg, Aaron Harberts and Craig Sweeny

Directed by: Akiva Goldsman


 

ENTER: ME

“Sometimes down is up, up is down. Sometimes when you’re lost, you’re found.”

For the second time in its first three instalments, Star Trek: Discovery has a ‘pilot’ episode, as 1.3 shoots forward six months from the USS Shenzhou’s clash with the Klingons and Captain Georgiou’s death, following Michael Burnham’s (Sonequa Martin-Green) heavily-contested and unorthodox efforts to save the ship, her captain and crew. Now, the woman who will not reply to “Mickey” is a silent, resigned, person-adverse prisoner being transferred to do mining work to help the Federation’s war effort.

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STAR TREK: DISCOVERY, 1.2 – “Battle at the Binary Stars” (Netflix Review)

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Streaming on UK Netflix from: Monday 25th September 2017

Story by: Bryan Fuller

Teleplay by: Gretchen J. Berg and Aaron Harberts

Directed by: Adam Kane


 

A HERO’S DEMISE

Following immediately on from the cliffhanger which left jaws agape at the close of “The Vulcan Hello” (reviewed HERE), Star Trek: Discovery episode 1.2 feels more like the second half of a two-part story than an isolated instalment in its own right. It is now clear why CBS and Netflix aired/released both episodes at the same time, because this is essentially the conclusion of the new show’s prologue; the televisual equivalent of a comic issue zero.

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Dunkirk (Cinema Review)

12A – 109mins – 2017


 

ALLIED COURAGE

May, 1940. Allied troops are trapped on the beaches of Dunkirk. They require air, ground and sea cover from British and French forces – both naval and civilian – to see them safely evacuated as Germany advances into France.

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War for the Planet of the Apes (Cinema Review)

12A – 141mins – 2017 – 3D


 

APE-POCALPYSE NOW

In my time as webmaster of The CR@Bpendium, I have noticed that a guilty tendency of mine is to lavish blockbuster sequels in franchises I adore with 5-star ratings. The Force Awakens and Rogue One, for instance, were always destined to be looked upon kindly by me, a long-time Star Wars fan. Yet more casual movie watchers may recognise issues, however minor, with both films which would impede a perfect score in the eyes of the general public.

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Transformers: The Last Knight (Cinema Review)

12A – 149mins – 2017 – 3D


 

PIECE OF SCRAP

I know it’s lazy to deride Michael Bay’s bloated brigade of big ‘bot battle blockbusters, but boy is this fifth Transformers film a rotten piece of shit! I realise that isn’t a very erudite (or polite) way to kickstart a review, but I’m not editing it for two reasons: Firstly, multi-millionaire Bay, producers Paramount and Hasbro Studios won’t care what The CR@Bpendium thinks of their gallizion dollar expanded-universe franchise – people will still turn out in droves. Secondly, given the amount of bad language that litters this light-hearted adapted-from-toys summer sequel, apparently kids are down with the swearz these days, too?! So the shit stays where it is.

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Hacksaw Ridge (Cinema Review)

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15 – 139mins – 2016


 

CONSCIENTIOUS PARTICIPANT

I have always struggled with war films. I just feel a disassociation from the genre which I have struggled to shake off. Maybe I never will. Nevertheless, the amount of love Mel Gibson’s first directorial effort in over a decade has received (despite many a person’s reservations about his off-screen personality) has made Hacksaw Ridge hard to ignore. I saw the elongated runtime and grimaced, but having put aside my hesitations in a packed cinema this afternoon, I can confirm that the man they call ‘Mad Mel’ has won me over.

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Under the Shadow (Netflix Review)

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15 – 84mins – 2016


 

BOMBS UP IN MY FLAT

“A woman should be scared of exposing herself above everything else.”

Set against the sobering backdrop of the War of the Cities during the Iran-Iraq conflict of the 1980s, this Tehran-set spine-tingler manages to astutely capture both the palpable anxiety civilian’s felt living with the threat of missiles literally crushing their homes and the repressive social inequality of the period metaphorically crushing their livelihoods.

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War Dogs (DVD Review)

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15 – 109mins – 2016


 

ARMS AND THE DUDES

“This isn’t about being pro-war… this is about being pro-money.”

It is 2005 and the War in Iraq is ongoing. Struggling to support his girlfriend (Knock Knock’s Ana de Armas) and incoming new addition, 20-something Miami Beach masseur David Packouz (Allegiant’s Miles Teller) is persuaded into the morally murky waters of online international arms dealing when he reconnects with old childhood friend Efraim Diveroli (Sausage Party’s Jonah Hill) at a hometown funeral.

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Swallows and Amazons (DVD Review)

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PG – 93mins – 2016


THE UNDISCOVERED ISLAND

Following a beloved 1974 adaptation, Arthur Ransome’s classic children’s book gets its second silver screen outing courtesy of screenwriter Andrea Gibb and TV director Philippa Lowthorpe, in her feature film debut. Andrew Sherlock Scott, Rafe The BFG Spall, Kelly Special Correspondents Macdonald, Jessica Bridget Jones’s Baby Hynes and Harry Upstart Crow Enfield add star clout in supporting roles, but the plucky kids are the real driving force here.

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